Hide Sora notification

Try Sora - the student reading app, by OverDrive

Apple App Store
Google Play Store
  Main Nav
Darius the Great Deserves Better
Cover of Darius the Great Deserves Better
Darius the Great Deserves Better
Darius the Great Series, Book 2
Borrow Borrow Borrow
In this companion to the award-winning Darius the Great Is Not Okay, Darius suddenly has it all: a boyfriend, an internship, a spot on the soccer team. It's everything he's ever wanted—but what if he...
In this companion to the award-winning Darius the Great Is Not Okay, Darius suddenly has it all: a boyfriend, an internship, a spot on the soccer team. It's everything he's ever wanted—but what if he...
Available Formats-
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1

Recommended for you

 

Description-

  • In this companion to the award-winning Darius the Great Is Not Okay, Darius suddenly has it all: a boyfriend, an internship, a spot on the soccer team. It's everything he's ever wanted—but what if he deserves better?
    Darius Kellner is having a bit of a year. Since his trip to Iran, a lot has changed. He's getting along with his dad, and his best friend Sohrab is only a Skype call away. Between his first boyfriend, Landon, varsity soccer practices, and an internship at his favorite tea shop, things are falling into place.
    Then, of course, everything changes. Darius's grandmothers are in town for a long visit, and Darius can't tell whether they even like him. The internship is not going according to plan, Sohrab isn't answering Darius's calls, and Dad is far away on business. And Darius is sure he really likes Landon . . . but he's also been hanging out with Chip Cusumano, former bully and current soccer teammate—and well, maybe he's not so sure about anything after all.
    Darius was just starting to feel okay, like he finally knew what it meant to be Darius Kellner. But maybe okay isn't good enough. Maybe Darius deserves better.
 

Awards-

Excerpts-

  • From the book

    The History of Creation

     

    The first cut is always the hardest.

    “You ready?”

    I met Mikaela’s eyes in the mirror.

    “Yeah.”

    The clippers buzzed to life and growled in my ear as she pushed the teeth through the back of my hair. The curls tickled my neck as they fell to the floor.

    It was tradition among the student athletes on Chapel Hill High School’s varsity men’s soccer team (Go Chargers!) to get their hair cut before the first game of the season. It was supposed to promote team unity.

    Except I had my internship at Rose City Teas on Sunday when everyone else got their haircuts, so I had to make a separate appointment.

    It was my first haircut in two years.

    “How high do you want this fade?” Mikaela asked as she neared my ears.

    I’d never met Mikaela before, but Landon recommended her. She was beautiful, with brown skin, impeccable box braids, and the brightest smile I’d ever seen.

    I shrugged, but I wasn’t sure she could tell from under the plastic cover. “I don’t know,” I said. “What do you think would look best?”

    She turned off the clippers and looked at me in the mirror for a second. “Probably something higher for you. Show off these beautiful curls up top.”

    “Okay.”

    I relaxed and let her turn my head this way and that as she worked, first with clippers and then with a pair of scissors. When she was done, Mikaela took me to the hair-washing station. I guess it wasn’t designed for tall people: I had to scoot my butt to the edge of the chair to fit my head in the basin. But she washed my hair and massaged my scalp (which was just about the nicest thing I had ever felt) and got all the itchy bits off, and then it was back to the chair for styling.

    “You use product?”

    I shook my head.

    She pulled at one of my curls—she hadn’t touched the top, except for a little trimming—and twisted it around her finger.

    “Landon said you’re . . . Indian?”

    “Iranian. Half.”

    “Sorry.” She let the curl fall. “Lucky boy.”

    My cheeks warmed.

    “Thanks.”

    Mikaela squeezed something that smelled like coconuts into her hands and massaged it into my hair. It made it a little shinier but kept it soft. She took one last lock from the very front and pulled it down into my forehead, so it dangled like a little question mark.

    “All set.”

    I studied myself in the mirror. Instead of my usual messy halo, I had a huge pile of curls up top, but the sides and back of my head faded from super short black hair down to my skin.

    I hadn’t seen the sides of my head in years.

    I’d never noticed how much my ears stuck out.

    “It looks great,” I said, even though I was kind of anxious about my ears. “Really.”

    “Yeah it does,” Mikaela said. “Let’s go ring you up.”

    Landon was waiting for me up front. He got this big goofy smile on his face when he saw me.

    “Wow.”

    I smiled and looked down to open the Velcro on my wallet.

    “You like it?”

    “I really do.”

    Landon’s hand brushed mine, and I curled my thumb to trap it. He wove our fingers together and led me out the sliding glass doors.

    It was one of Portland’s perfect fall days, where it was warm enough that you didn’t have to wear your hoodie, but cool enough that it was cozy if you did.

    (I had on...

Reviews-

  • Kirkus

    Starred review from June 15, 2020
    A second chapter for the endearingly sweet, Star Trek--loving "Fractional Persian" Darius Kellner. Visiting Iran. Scoring the internship of his dreams at Rose City Teas. Playing on his high school's varsity men's soccer team--where his awesome teammates keep the bullies at bay. Having a lot of fun kissing Landon, a prospective first boyfriend with "television cheekbones." But even all these highs can't keep Darius' depression at bay. Landon might be cute--and Darius' Persian mother certainly approves of Landon's cooking abilities--but he keeps pressuring Darius to go beyond kissing when he isn't ready. Darius also worries about his terminally ill grandfather and best friend, Sohrab, both "half a world away" in Iran. Family troubles and confusing feelings for a teammate only exacerbate the "burning plasma reactor feeling" in Darius' chest. With rich characters and multilayered storytelling, Khorram's sophomore effort deepens the complexity of Darius' world. Blending broad themes like consent and toxic masculinity with the specificity of Darius' intersectional identity (gay, white and Iranian), this coming-of-age masterpiece packs a multitude of truth and heart. As "super white" as the Portland, Oregon, setting may be, Khorram takes care to incorporate the diversity that does exist within the city. While the first volume focused heavily on Darius' relationship with his dad, this one expands the focus, balancing tough situations with a hopeful undercurrent. A sequel that gets better and better the longer it steeps. (Fiction. 12-18)

    COPYRIGHT(2020) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Booklist

    Starred review from August 1, 2020
    Grades 9-12 *Starred Review* This delightful sequel to Darius the Great Is Not Okay (2018) finds Darius back in Portland, openly gay, and with a boyfriend (his first) named Landon. Darius has his dream job working part-time at Rose City Teas, which keeps the young tea connoisseur stocked with his favorite beverage. But things are unsettled at home. Money is tight, and his parents are working themselves to a frazzle, while his father is experiencing a major depressive episode, even as Darius continues to deal with his own depression. At school, the odious Trent still bullies Darius mercilessly; although, to his credit, beautiful Chip, Trent's best friend, has become Darius' friend as well. The best thing about school, however, is Darius being on the varsity soccer team, which the former loner thinks is pretty cool. But change is never far from Darius' life, much of it unwelcome. What will come of his relationship with Landon, for example? What is up with Chip? And why won't his best friend, Sohrab, who's in Iran, accept or return his calls? Khorram has done a beautiful job of limning Darius' development as a character, creating situations that believably foster his growth. The plot, rich in incident, is compelling, and the best thing is an open ending, which promises another book about the appealing Darius, who remains great.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2020, American Library Association.)

  • School Library Journal

    Starred review from September 1, 2020

    Gr 8 Up-In the award-winning Darius the Great Is Not Okay, Iranian American Darius's sexuality is inferred, but never stated. Now Darius is out, has a boyfriend, and is supported by his family and high school soccer teammates. He video-chats with his best friend and family in Iran for updates about his dying grandfather, but while Iran's landscapes and Persian culture are spotlighted in the first book, here the focus is on Darius navigating the complexities of being a multiracial gay teenager. He continues to be bullied, but Darius is more concerned with his younger sister Laleh's first experiences with racism and microaggressions. As his parents struggle financially and, like Darius, with depression, his aloof, queer grandmothers are asked to live with the family for a while to help out. They eventually open up as family dilemmas force them to be more involved, and Darius learns a little about their relationship and LGBTQIA+ history. This is a page-turning YA romance at its core. The repeating line, "That's normal, right?" reminds readers that Darius is an insecure teenager who is trying to figure out life, just like everybody else. The author skillfully places worries about being uncircumcised and having inopportune erections alongside descriptions of elegant oolong tea tastings. The soccer team's supportive culture, established by their Black female coach, is set neatly within the frame of Darius's tense family dynamic. VERDICT Khorram again presents an artful tapestry of sci-fi fandom, Persian culture, soccer, racism, sexuality, depression, family crises, a love triangle, and endless amounts of global teas in Darius's compelling story. Despite all of the seemingly disparate elements, this is a seamless and profound YA novel with a memorable and endearing main character.-Elaine Fultz, Oakwood City Sch., Dayton, OH

    Copyright 2020 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • The Horn Book

    July 1, 2020
    Since we last saw "Fractional Persian" Darius in 2019 Boston Globe-Horn Book honor book Darius the Great Is Not Okay (rev. 9/18), he's come out as gay, and has a boyfriend. Now back in Portland, Oregon, after his family trip to Iran, he's also started an internship at his favorite tea shop, made the varsity soccer team, and found friendship with his teammates. If only boyfriend Landon wasn't pressuring him for sex; he wasn't experiencing feelings for a teammate; and his dream job was living up to expectations. Add in his ongoing battle with clinical depression, his family's financial troubles and other worries, and not knowing why best friend Sohrab in Iran isn't answering his calls, and it's clear Darius deserves better. Khorram's emotional second book addresses many serious issues but is grounded in everyday life. Through Darius's intimate, conversational narration, Khorram provides moments of levity (mortification after an interrupted make-out session; a "catastrophic hull breach," a.k.a. an unfortunate kneeing during practice) as well as insight into Darius's insecurities (he's self-conscious about his appearance, new to dating, and prone to crying while on his medication). Darius's honest exploration of his sexual identity builds upon the growth he experienced with his cultural identity in the first book, and leaves readers curious and hopeful about where his journey will take him next.

    (Copyright 2020 by The Horn Book, Incorporated, Boston. All rights reserved.)

  • The Horn Book

    September 1, 2020
    Since we last saw "Fractional Persian" Darius in 2019 Boston Globe-Horn Book honor book Darius the Great Is Not Okay (rev. 9/18), he's come out as gay, and has a boyfriend. Now back in Portland, Oregon, after his family trip to Iran, he's also started an internship at his favorite tea shop, made the varsity soccer team, and found friendship with his teammates. If only boyfriend Landon wasn't pressuring him for sex; he wasn't experiencing feelings for a teammate; and his dream job was living up to expectations. Add in his ongoing battle with clinical depression, his family's financial troubles and other worries, and not knowing why best friend Sohrab in Iran isn't answering his calls, and it's clear Darius deserves better. Khorram's emotional second book addresses many serious issues but is grounded in everyday life. Through Darius's intimate, conversational narration, Khorram provides moments of levity (mortification after an interrupted make-out session; a "catastrophic hull breach," a.k.a. an unfortunate kneeing during practice) as well as insight into Darius's insecurities (he's self-conscious about his appearance, new to dating, and prone to crying while on his medication). Darius's honest exploration of his sexual identity builds upon the growth he experienced with his cultural identity in the first book, and leaves readers curious and hopeful about where his journey will take him next. Cynthia K. Ritter

    (Copyright 2020 by The Horn Book, Incorporated, Boston. All rights reserved.)

Title Information+

  • Publisher
    Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Kindle Book
    Release date:
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:

Digital Rights Information+

  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You have reached the maximum number of titles you are allowed to recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 99 titles every 1 days.

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend this title for your digital library.

Close

Enhanced Details:

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

MP3 audiobooks are only supported on macOS 10.6 (Snow Leopard) through 10.14 (Mojave). Learn more about MP3 audiobook support on Macs.

Close

Please update to the latest version of the OverDrive app to stream videos.

Close

Bahrain, Egypt, Hong Kong, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Recommend this title for your digital library
Darius the Great Deserves Better
Darius the Great Deserves Better
Darius the Great Series, Book 2
Adib Khorram
Optional:
Close
Buy it now
and support our digital library!
Darius the Great Deserves Better
Darius the Great Deserves Better
Darius the Great Series, Book 2
Adib Khorram
A portion of your purchase goes to support your digital library.
Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel

Sora Turbo
Get the app!
Apple App Store
Google Play Store
Brought to you by University Academy Charter High School, and built with 💕 by OverDrive.
Close

Renewing this title won't extend your lending period. Instead, it will let you borrow the title again immediately after your first lending period expires.

Close

You can't renew this title because there are holds on it. However, you can join the holds list and be notified when it becomes available for you to borrow again.

Close